Tag Archives: bird breeding

Fledglings Available for Adoption in Alabama

Bean, while she was determined to incubate seed.

Bean, determined to incubate seed.

**UPDATED 9/28/13!**

Hi finch friends!

This is Becca — I posted several months ago about my work as an ornithology technician in the New Hampshire forests.

I also keep a small (but growing) colony of zebra finches in a spare room in my apartment.  I can’t wait to post someday to share with you my trials and tribulations as a new finch owner but longtime bird lover, though for now I post with a different purpose!

I have embarked on the journey of breeding these little birds from time to time, both for my own personal enjoyment and to encourage pair bonding to stabilize my once-squabbling colony.

Given my space limitations, however, I sometimes find myself with several babies in need of good homes.  Chelsea has kindly allowed me to advertise my available birds here.  She has been a truly invaluable mentor in helping me foster these fat little friends!

Pancake, sitting fat and sassy.

Pancake, sitting fat and sassy.

Right now, I am looking for homes for three CFW sisters and a CFW/Fawn male.  Their parents, named Bean and Pancake, are personal favorites of mine for their especially fluffy demeanor and bold personalities.

The fledgies are still young (less than 2 months old) and seem to delight in rolling around in feces, but they are sweet and perky — and just starting to squeak tiny “beeps” of their own. Continue reading

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Hatchlings are almost ready to become fledgelings!

The first clutch of the season has been an eventful one of course! Still not sure how they will look exactly but I know they will be beautiful. 🙂

Today I saw 4 very well fed babies poking their heads out of their nest as they gather their courage to fledge. Parents Bella & Bronson (BC CFW & Fawn OB BB) are starting to lure them out with low chirps as they try to encourage them to venture out of their cozy home. It’s a happy surprise to see all 4 of their eggs hatched and were tended to so well.  Continue reading

The first 2013 Hatchlings!

Left: Baby butt! Middle: A full crop means great parents. Right: Little hatchlings just waking up.

Left: Baby butt! Middle: A full crop means great parents. Right: Little hatchlings just waking up.

To my surprise and joy this morning, three very loud beggars were squeaking for food, one so loud it overshadowed some of the CFW males’ songs. Everyone in their flight cages craned their necks to try to see the first babies of the season.

They belong to Bronson & Bella (Fawn OB BB & BC CFW), my colony-raised and newer lovelies. It’s been quite the journey bringing these newer pairs into breeding condition, and I’m glad the day is finally here for their first fertile eggs to hatch. I’ll be able to tell in the next few days which will be white and which will be.. otherwise! This is a mixed clutch so the colors will be diverse. I’m excited to see how they will turn out!

Continue reading

Local Breeder Review ~ Patty’s Finches & Canaries

Breeder Reviews by Chelsea @ LPBA
Often times I will get messages from people asking me where they can find a bird that I don’t have or a mutation I don’t have readily available. I am happy to pass along those people to the best possible options for them based on my experiences with breeders. In the Breeder Review section is where you can read about all of my experiences as a buyer and recommendations to help you in your search to adopt the healthiest and highest of quality feathered friend. All reviews are assigned a general rating with 4 being the highest.

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Patty’s Finches & Canaries – Silverdale, Wa.
Purchased: CFW, White
Also Available: Canaries & BC males
Pecking?: No
Bird Health/Quality: Fine
Current Status: Breeding only Canaries now

My Review: I found Patty on Craigslist when I first came to the area. After she contacted me to purchase hens I had to sample her services for myself. I was quite a bit wary about her breeding program at first but came to find she is a kind person and a member of the local Cascade Canary Breeder’s Association. She is no longer breeding Zebra Finches but she is still breeding Canaries.

Continue reading

New Species! – Society Finches

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My new sweet Societies 🙂

I am elated with this new forever pair I just got tonight through a private breeder. They are so very pretty, happy and just so sweet. And the male’s song is beautiful! I will have to think up some names for them soon.

As soon as I placed them in the warm and cozy bird room they fluffed their feathers, groomed each other lovingly and closed their eyes. I don’t think I could have asked for a better homecoming.

I placed some fresh boiled egg soft food as well as crushed eggshells in their cage and they ate the soft food up immediately. I’m sure they will still be working on the eggshells in the morning.

For the next few days of quarantine they will stay in their travel cage so there are no pretty flowers in their pictures as their usually would be.

Next week I am getting another Society pair as well as new pairs of zebra mutations. I can’t wait!

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A New Season, A New Aviary.

Breeding is back in swing, and I will be posting updates on pairs and babies as they come. To reserve a pair, please contact me as I operate on a first come first serve basis.

Where have I been? Relocating, settling, relocating again is the gist of it. Now let’s focus on the what I’m going to do!

Coming Soon

  • All of my new cages are going to be organized in a home-made aviary. I’m incredibly excited about it! Something between these two:
       
  • Take new photos of the aviary and new pairs.
  • Adopt new species! I’m thinking Society and Owl Finches! Maybe even some Gouldians!

Continue reading

For anyone who has ever tried to get their birds to use a nest box…

Can’t get your birds to use the nest box? Do they sit on top of it, or even build a nest on top of it?

Well I’ve found a solution!

When we last left the aviary, only Al & Aphrodite were nestbox-savy. Well I got very tired of it and decided to try to come up with a solution instead of waiting for everyone to figure it out. I researched it for hours on the net, and nothing. Apparently no one had a solution other than time.

Malarkey.

I opened the top of the nesting boxes that weren’t being used, put down some of each nesting material, and voila! Draven & Dhalia started building a nest in a box.

BUT Oedipus & Ophelia…still don’t get it. Nope, they now perch on the new vacation feeder from LGF.

Which brings me to my next point…

From LGF

This feeder thing, is amazing.

It catches the husks – no mess!

I’m in love.

And I use the little finger trays for everything else: f-vite, herb salad, tonic seed, powdered kelp…it’s freakin awesome.

I’m getting two more for the tonic seed. Oh yes.

Wish they had one for spray millet!

Adding to the Flock!

This Friday I’ll be getting a new pair, and a fledgling! They’re Black-cheeked Zebras, so they’re a bit unusual – which I like. They look like a black and white drawing or photo of a Zebra Finch to me.

I’ll be getting the new birds just a couple weeks before the aviary upgrade, so the pair will be housed in another cage. I’ll be adding more to the flock soon.

I’ll also be adding to the site today, to include all the updates I’ve been talking about, along with some product information in the “What you’ll need…” section.

Outdoor vs Indoor Aviaries

From my avairy ideas Pinterest list – click for more info and credit.

Out or in? Large or small? Bought or made? My head has been spinning since researching aviary options for my birds.

So while combing through the pages of The Lady Gouldian Finch while showing the site to a friend, I happened upon their aviary of the month.

I’ve seen it a few times now, and can’t get the idea out of my head: that an outdoor aviary is very popular for breeders, so maybe that means its the best kind of aviary?

What I’ve found is that certainly is a popular option. Why? Because most bird hobbyists don’t just ever own one or two birds – they own a large number of pairs for both enjoyment as pets and for breeding purposes.

From LGF – click for more info and credit.

Outdoor Aviaries
Outdoor aviaries are more feasible for warmer climates, but all birds enjoy being able to be closer to nature. In colder climates, aviary owners can enable their birds to enjoy the outdoor experience by either housing them on a warm sun porch or building an additional outside attachment to their indoor aviaries.

Outdoor aviaries also present new risks for your birds when you house them outside – pests, disease and predators (including feral or neighborhood cats, foxes, snakes, birds of prey, etc.) are a few.

To ensure that your birds are not infected from the various diseases they may encounter in an outdoor aviary, it is important to vaccinate or medicate your flock for anything they may come into contact with. This can include diseases passed via insects or other pests. It only takes one bird coming into contact with a contagious disease for an entire flock to be infected. This not only affects your flock but also anyone you have given or sold birds to. Symptoms may take generations or months to materialize and are especially hard to notice in a large flock in an outdoor aviary.

You can help secure the health of your birds by treating them yearly with over-the-counter medications and seeking vaccinations from your veterinarian as needed. For a list of treatable diseases with medicines found at LG, click here. For a list of possible diseases that Finches can encounter, click here and scroll down to the “Bacterial, Protozoa, Fungal & Virus” section. For a list of symptoms and disease recognition, click here

Finches need warm places to live since their natural climate is hot and arid. If you do choose an entirely outdoor aviary in a colder climate, you will need to ensure that their enclosure or building stays consistently warm. Outdoor aviaries need to be designed to provide a safe environment for birds from any and all outside factors including weather and direct sunlight.

From my avairy ideas Pinterest list - click for more info and credit.

From my avairy ideas Pinterest list – click for more info and credit.

Species Compatibility
A common mistake when you’re housing multiple species of small birds together is combining hookbills with softbills – Budgies/etc. with Finches. I hear stories of it all of the time – they may look like they are playing at first, but then it takes a deadly turn in an instant. Another multi-species mistake is housing aggressive Finches together or other species that are not compatible. Here is an incredible compatibility chart from Finche Niche for more information about housing breeds together.

There are many Finch species that are compatible enough to live together in a large aviary. The hardiest ones that I feel are the easiest to introduce to each other and also work well together are: Zebra & Society Finches. Society Finches also make excellent surrogate parents. Be careful when adding to your flock, though. The more birds you take on, the more time and money that you will need to go into their care.

From my avairy ideas Pinterest list - click for more info and credit.

From my avairy ideas Pinterest list – click for more info and credit.

My Choice
In the end, I’ve decided that indoor individual flight cages paired with indoor aviaries and a large walk-in aviary inside of a bird room is what I prefer. It provides the protection from all of the outdoor elements that I don’t want to expose my birds to, while still providing my birds with plenty of living and flying space.

For more aviary photos – click the picture to visit LGF. You can see more pictures of my personal favorite outdoor and indoor aviary ideas on my Aviary Pinterest list.

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