Tag Archives: finch

20 Charcoal, Fawn, White & Pied Finches available in Sydney, Australia

Charcoal male & his young offspring

By Wayne

Hi all, my name is Wayne and I live in the suburb of Pennant Hills in Sydney, Australia. I will be shortly moving house and will not be able to take my flock of around twenty zebra finches with me. As I will be moving in three weeks, whoever wants them, must take the lot. 

Chelsea has kindly allowed me to place my information here. My zebra finches are Charcoal, Fawn, White and Dappled (Pied) in color, all are healthy birds. They would be the perfect flock for a beginner to start some selective breading.

I would like to give my birds to someone who could give them a good home. They come with a traveling cage and plenty of seed to keep them going! If you’re interested please message me here

Additional Photos (click to enlarge):
wayne3 wayne4 wayne5

Advertisements

The Gouldians have arrived!!~

A couple of my new Gouldians! Aren't they lovely? (TWFA 2014)

A couple of my new Gouldians! Aren’t they lovely? (TWFA 2014)

Here they are pictured at the very tippity top of their aviary under the roof where they no doubt feel safest. They’re so gorgeous! I’ll take more pics tomorrow after they’ve settled in and had time to get used to their new aviary. After I’ve gathered enough in the next few days I’ll post an update with my plans for them.

All they’ve been doing since they arrived is sleep.. eat.. sing.. sleep.. then repeat. 🙂 I can’t stop watching them check out their surroundings and I know between their aviary and the bird room I’ll never get anything done now! So very happy they’re home.~

Fledglings Available for Adoption in Alabama

Bean, while she was determined to incubate seed.

Bean, determined to incubate seed.

**UPDATED 9/28/13!**

Hi finch friends!

This is Becca — I posted several months ago about my work as an ornithology technician in the New Hampshire forests.

I also keep a small (but growing) colony of zebra finches in a spare room in my apartment.  I can’t wait to post someday to share with you my trials and tribulations as a new finch owner but longtime bird lover, though for now I post with a different purpose!

I have embarked on the journey of breeding these little birds from time to time, both for my own personal enjoyment and to encourage pair bonding to stabilize my once-squabbling colony.

Given my space limitations, however, I sometimes find myself with several babies in need of good homes.  Chelsea has kindly allowed me to advertise my available birds here.  She has been a truly invaluable mentor in helping me foster these fat little friends!

Pancake, sitting fat and sassy.

Pancake, sitting fat and sassy.

Right now, I am looking for homes for three CFW sisters and a CFW/Fawn male.  Their parents, named Bean and Pancake, are personal favorites of mine for their especially fluffy demeanor and bold personalities.

The fledgies are still young (less than 2 months old) and seem to delight in rolling around in feces, but they are sweet and perky — and just starting to squeak tiny “beeps” of their own. Continue reading

Off-Season Breeding & Penguin Update~

If you’ve been following the TWFA updates for this past season, then you’ve heard me gripe about my finickiest new mutation, my pairs of Penguin Zebra Finches.

What exactly makes them finicky? To start, on average they lay 1-2 eggs per clutch and will lay about 1-2 times per breeding season. They’re fragile breeders, finicky eaters and also more susceptible to illness which means it’s a good idea to keep them fat, exercised and on a consistent, balanced diet. Did I mention that they’re a challenge which I am crazy enough to enjoy? The babies they’ve produced this year have been some of the cutest and quickest to be adopted. 

It has definitely been a journey to bring them all into prime breeding condition to say the least! Both Penguin pairs have been thoroughly rested since their last clutch of babies, and have been moved to the aviary’s year-round breeding cycle. This schedule is reserved for pairs that lay 1-2 clutches each year and take breaks of up to 6 months in between.

After some nest changes and settling into the new house with a new view of the outdoors, I have returned home from a week of absence to find 5 freshly laid eggs in a newly built nest made of natural organic materials as well as pieces of their fresh millet branches. Always a happy find here in the aviary! The other Penguins are still deciding between a nest box and a cup-style, still carrying supplies here and there without any real building going on.

A slower than usual process
All of my Penguins get more natural light and less synthetic so they are not overstressed or overstimulated during their light breeding schedule. They also receive their high protein foods after they begin laying which assists them during the parenting process. I’ve also been introducing multiple nest options since these pairs are new to the aviary and to breeding so as anyone can guess, some nests are favored over others. All of these precautions do make for a slower breeding process but that is their “flow” which is always the goal here, to find their favorite environment and to replicate it in the most natural way for the rest of their lives. Continue reading

The Fresh Food & Vitamin Program ~ Does it work in pieces?

Ioford multivitamin supplement from LG (ladygouldian.com).

Ioford multivitamin supplement from LG (ladygouldian.com).

If you’ve browsed the pages of TWFA then you’ve read over many recommendations and articles pertaining to fresh organic foods as well as the Avian Veterinarian Dr. Rob Marshall’s vitamin supplement program. I’ve always been told by vendors and hobbyists that these foods don’t need to be used all at once – it’s okay to simply use bits and pieces.

I was fairly skeptical of this method and thought that even with the fresh organic foods, the vitamin programs needed to be used as a whole. However I relayed the vendor and hobbyist recommendations that even separate elements of the nutrients are better than none at all.

Because this topic was brought up by multiple adopters at the end of the 2012 & beginning of 2013 seasons I decided to try it on behalf of our fans and visitors as well who come to this site for care advice. Their Finches rely on this advice to be correct after all! So in order to make a proper recommendation I needed to try this method with my own flock to really put it to the test. Continue reading

Days 18 & 7 ~ Survival Tips & Flock Annoyances

This post is part of my participation in the 31 Day Bird Blogging Challenge @ Students & Birds. Join me & participate in your own way through forum posts, Facebook notes/posts, Pinterest pins, etc!

Day 18 – Your best Finch survival tip.

I have 2 main survival tips when it comes to raising & breeding Finches. The first is to make things fun. Whether this is challenging yourself to keep a rare species or mutation of Finch, blogging or posting on the forum about your birds, working towards upgrading your setups or adding an aviary, or raising your own babies by hand, each hobbyist has to make it theirs in order to truly enjoy it sometimes. This is also helpful to remember on those not-so-easy days when you may be less inclined to spend time with your birds, either due to a recent event or a growing lack of interest. When it isn’t fun for you, it isn’t fun for your flock so challenge yourself to do something new! Continue reading

New Article ~ Incubators & Hand-feeding

When to Hand-raise & When to Leave Them Be

As the Lafeber’s formula label reads, “Hand-feeding pet birds requires love, patience, and proper nutrition.” The way to successfully raise Finches by hand is to devote as much time as possible to the endeavor to both increasing your survival rate through multiple feedings and to socializing and hand-training your babies. This ensures their health and development as well as their ability to bond well with you and other human beings in the future.

First, I must say it to the point where it’s ingrained in every reader’s mind ~ you should never remove baby Finches or any other baby animal from their parents’ care. Period. It’s not only traumatic for the baby (especially after the imprinting process has begun) but it is just as traumatic for the parents. Pairs who regularly have their babies removed, picked up by human hands, or peeked at will often times stop laying altogether or start to toss/abandon their young. If your goal is to provide your birds with the best care possible, then it is vital to allow them to complete the parenting process as they are naturally inclined to (this includes the weaning process). The only time I will remove eggs or babies is if they have been abandoned or neglected, and that is the only time I would recommend “stepping in” to save the lives of the offspring. That is the responsibility of every breeder. Continue reading

1 Month Bird Blogging Challenge & New Resources

(An updated photo of the brooder babies)

(An updated photo of the brooder babies)

Brooder Babies
3 More babies are in the brooder at the moment! They’re over the 1 week hump now & are almost finished feathering out into some beautiful colors ~ 2 Phaeo & 1 Fawn. They’ll be moving out of the brooder & into a cage soon. Even in the Summer months, my babies love the R-Com. They look like small dinosaurs at this stage of their lives, walking around on top of the nesting materials & stretching their wings. They spend some time each day being active & even clumsily pecking at the new materials in the brooder. They enjoy being pet as you see (right) & human interaction/other forms of affection.

Our other 2 hand-tame Phaeos are nearing their first molt and don’t seem to mind sharing a little hand space with their new “siblings” from the brooder. They hop around the bird room from cage to cage socializing with their favorite pairs during their daily free-fly time and are starting to reluctantly taste their Tonic Seed & Spray Millet. They’re still dependent on hand feedings and it will be a slow process to wean them. I’m really enjoying their company in the mean time.~

31 Day Bird Blogging Challenge
As things shut down here this month and we continue to decorate/construct in preparation for our photo shoot, I will be participating in Students & Birds‘ current Blogging Challenge (I talk more about their awesome blog below). What a fantastic idea for us avian enthusiast authors! 🙂 This will give me a chance to write more about the aviary in a creative way while keeping everyone entertained through our dust. I won’t be writing every day as the challenge implies, but I will be covering all of the 31 topics before the end of the season. Continue reading

Insightful Finch Course from The Finch Center

I recently came across The Finch Center ~ a website owned by Jennie Samuel who is the author of “The Easy Approach to Finch Care.” This site was immediately bookmarked and added to the Resource section of my links page.

I am ashamed to admit this book is still on my ‘to read’ list after I finish soaking up the knowledge inside “Clinical Avian Medicine” which is proving to be quite a feat given my current load. Her book is a wonderful resource that many other Finch breeders recommend and I can’t wait to read it for myself.

Jennie’s website is full of incredibly insightful information, and her Finch Course is no exception. Any hobbyist can apply for free and receive tutorials and articles via email with an easy to use sign up form.

I have really enjoyed her messages thus far and always look forward to the next. Her words will not only stimulate your Finch knowledge but also gives you a number of reliable suggestions that may have even the advanced hobbyists re-thinking aspects of their husbandry.

New Voices in the Aviary

Our chorus of begging babies has evolved into an aria of new songs in the aviary. Our fat little beggars have turned into some beautiful juveniles. I’m elated with the colors that are hopping out of the nests to greet me, and the begginings of male songs as they begin their independence. We have a couple of surprises like our Lightback BC hen (pictured to the left) who is a lovely Grey/Fawn color and our BB split Fawn hen who will be joining her clutch mates in their new homes soon.

Hand-tame Babies
We also have a pair of hand-raised Phaeo babies (Fawn Cheek BB) who are scheduled to go to wonderful and loving homes with their new adoptive hobbyist owners soon. It will be sad to see them go but I will know their new parents will enjoy their company & affection ~ and goofiness!

They were raised by hand in my R-Com Mini on Lafeber’s Nutristart formula, and as you can see are growing into chunky healthy babies.

Here is a video of our hand-raised pair from the TWFA Video Channel~ I just shot it today and you can watch the pair fly to my shoulder when called.
Continue reading

Skipio's | Fly Farm Products

The best food for aviary birds, backyard chickens, and wild bird suet.

NFSS | The National Finch & Softbill Society

Avian Husbandry, Conservation, Propagation & Exhibition

The White Finch Aviary

Breeder of Fine Finches

Evergreen State Photography

Life in the PNW rainforest

Wild Parrots of New York

Quaker Parrots & Monk Parakeets in the New York Metro Area

Lara Joseph

An animal training, behavior, and enrichment specialist.

Birdie Bootcamp

Getting my life (and my butt) in shape

arlenepowers

Arlene Powers Bird Art and Discussion Site

%d bloggers like this: